This post is part 57 of 67 in the series Programming by Stealth

As we’ve learned in previous instalments, there are four distinct aspects to Bootstrap, a collection of utility CSS classes, a collection of styles for controlling built-in HTML elements like headers, figures, images, and tables (which Bootstrap refers to as content), page layout functionality, and a collection of re-usable components that don’t exist in native HTML. We started by looking at the utilities, then moved on to styling the standard HTML elements, and now we’re ready for our first look at layout.

Bootstrap’s layout functionality is designed from the ground up to be responsive, that is to say, to allow you to control the layout of a page differently depending on the size of the viewport. For example, you can create a single layout that shows as a simple single column when viewed on a small phone screen, two columns on a tablet, and three on a device with a larger screen.

Going from zero to responsive design would be a big leap, so we’re going to break it down into two distinct parts. In this instalment we’re going to confine ourselves to creating layouts that work on larger screen devices like desktops, laptops, and large tablets. Once we can lay things out at one size, then we’ll add in responsiveness in the following instalment.

You can download this instalment’s ZIP file here.

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This post is part 56 of 67 in the series Programming by Stealth

In the previous instalment we got our first look at the functionality the Bootstrap documentation groups together under the heading Content. These are opt-in additional styles for standard HTML elements. Last time we looked at headings, paragraphs, quotations and lists. This time we’ll finish our overview of this aspect of Bootstrap with a look at styling images, figures, and tables.

In the next instalment we’ll move on to the most powerful aspect of Bootstrap, layout. This will take us a few instalments to cover, but when we’re done we’ll have learned how to use Bootstrap to arrange content on a page, and, better yet, to make our layouts responsive. That is to say, we’ll learn how to use Bootstrap to make our pages look right on any screen, from the smallest phone to the largest desktop!

You can download this instalment’s ZIP file here.

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This post is part 55 of 67 in the series Programming by Stealth

In this instalment we’ll continue our exploration of Bootstrap, making a start on the second of the four main aspects of Bootstrap — content. This is the word the Bootstrap team have used to describe Bootstrap’s styling of regular HTML tags for things like headers, paragraphs, lists, tables, etc.. In the previous two instalments we looked at the first of the four aspects, the utility classes, and when we finish with the content aspect we’ll move in to look at the third aspect — layout.

It’s going to take us at least two instalments to look at Bootstrap content. We’ll make a start in this instalment by focusing on the most important classes related to the HTML elements Bootstrap’s documentation (somewhat confusingly IMO) bundles together under the sub-heading Typography (under Content). Specifically that means headings, paragraphs, block quotations, and lists.

You can download the ZIP file for this instalment here.

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This post is part 54 of 67 in the series Programming by Stealth

In the previous instalment we started our exploration of Bootstrap with a look at some of its commonly used utility CSS classes. We’ll finish that off in this instalment by looking at some more utility CSS classes. That will finish out our initial look at the utilities. We’ll then be ready to move on to the next major component of Bootstrap, the CSS libraries it provides for enhancing existing HTML content.

The ZIP file for this instalment can be downloaded here.

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This post is part 53 of 67 in the series Programming by Stealth

We’ll start this instalment with a very quick look at my sample solution to the previous instalment‘s challenge. Then, we’ll really get stuck into Bootstrap.

As we learned last time, Bootstrap can be thought of as consisting of four separate chunks of functionality — layout, content, components, and utilities. Because utilities are universally useful, that’s where we’ll be start our journey. In this instalment we’ll meet our first few Bootstrap utility CSS classes.

You can download the ZIP file for this instalment here.

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This post is part 52 of 67 in the series Programming by Stealth

In this first instalment back after our month-long hiatus we change tack completely, moving away from JavaScript altogether, and diving right back into HTML and CSS.

One of the golden rules of programming is not to waste your time needlessly re-inventing the wheel. This is the driving motivation behind the development of many open source libraries. The aim is to give programmers a leg up by providing pre-built foundations for them to build on. The best example of this approach we’ve seen so-far in this series is jQuery. Today, I’m going to introduce you to another one, Bootstrap.

Out of the box, all versions of HTML, even HTML 5, have some significant short-comings:

  • The default style is just plain ugly!
  • There are no simple tags for creating complex page layouts.
  • There are no simple tags for facilitating responsive design (same page displayed differently depending on screen resolution).
  • Some basic elements and behaviours common to many web pages are not provided.

Bootstap aims to solve all these shortcomings using a combination of mostly CSS combined with a little JavaScript.

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