This post is part 39 of 39 in the series Taming the Terminal

In the previous instalment we learned how to use the tmux as a replacement for the screen command which has been deprecated on RedHat Enterprise Linux (and hence CentOS too). In this instalment we’ll take TMUX to the next level, making use of the fact that a single TMUX session can contain arbitrarily many windows, each consisting of arbitrarily many panes.

As a reminder from last time — in the TMUX-universe, sessions contain windows contain panes. By default a session contains one window which contains one full-width and full-height pane. Windows can be thought of as stacking behind each other, like tabs in a browser, and panes are arrayed next to each other within a window.

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This post is part 38 of 39 in the series Taming the Terminal

Since we covered the screen command in instalment 36, it has been deprecated in Red Enterprise Linux 8, and the official advice from Red Hat is to transition to the tmux command. Having been a fan of screen for years, I was skeptical, but I shouldn’t have been — tmux can do everything screen can, it can arguably do it better, and, it can do much more than screen ever could!

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This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

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This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

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This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

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This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

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This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

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This post is part 92 of 92 in the series Programming by Stealth

This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

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This post is part 91 of 92 in the series Programming by Stealth

This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

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While I wrote these MacOS Quick Actions to scratch my own proverbial itch, I think they could be of use to others, so I’m releasing them as open source.

The actions allow you to calculate the word count, line count, and character count of selected text, to convert a text selection to upper case, lower case, or title case, to do the same to the contents of the clipboard, and to convert the clipboard from rich text to plain text and to trim the contents of the clipboard.

You can download the actions and read the docs on GitHub.

As well as describing what each of the Quick Actions do, the GitHub docs also describe how to install the actions, how to use them, and how to assign keyboard shortcuts to them if desired.

If you’re curious to learn how these Quick Actions work, read on.

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