This post is part 39 of 39 in the series Taming the Terminal

In the previous instalment we learned how to use the tmux as a replacement for the screen command which has been deprecated on RedHat Enterprise Linux (and hence CentOS too). In this instalment we’ll take TMUX to the next level, making use of the fact that a single TMUX session can contain arbitrarily many windows, each consisting of arbitrarily many panes.

As a reminder from last time — in the TMUX-universe, sessions contain windows contain panes. By default a session contains one window which contains one full-width and full-height pane. Windows can be thought of as stacking behind each other, like tabs in a browser, and panes are arrayed next to each other within a window.

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In instalment 30 of the Taming the Terminal series I showed how SSH keys can be used to more securely and conveniently connect to servers. The instructions in that instalment are for Linux-like OSes (including MacOS) where the standard OpenSSH tools are available.

Windows doesn’t ship with OpenSSH (or indeed any SSH implementation), so Windows users who want to SSH need to install some kind of additional software. With Windows 10 there is the obvious option of installing the Windows Subsystem for Linux, but people may prefer a GUI experience. The obvious choice for Windows users is the venerable free and open source PuTTY suite of tools.

The PuTTY SSH client itself is easy to use, and if you install the full suite of apps via the MSI installer (available on their download page) you’ll also get a GUI for generating SSH keys named PuTTYgen.

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