This is the second part of a two-part post – read part 1 here.

In part 1 we learned how to use the command line too hsxkpasswd to generate passwords, and how to use various flags to specify custom password generation configurations, and word sources. In this second part we’ll look at how to save these customisations for future use with .hsxkpasswdrc files.

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Since version 3.5, the Crypt::HSXKPasswd password generating perl module ships with a command line interface to the password generator called hsxkpasswd. This provides a way for non-Perl programers to access the vast majority of the module’s functionality.

The easiest way to install the module, and it’s accompanying terminal command is via CPAN:

sudo cpan Crypt::HSXKPasswd

Once the module is installed, you’ll have access to the hsxkpasswd terminal command.

Getting started is simple, run the command with no arguments at all and it will generate one password using the default settings:

bart-iMac2013:~ bart$ hsxkpasswd
@@26.MEASURE.below.LIFT.95@@
bart-iMac2013:~ bart$

If you want more passwords, pass a number as an argument, and you’ll get that many passwords:

bart-iMac2013:~ bart$ hsxkpasswd 10
~~08!hole!VOWEL!then!45~~
$$49^monday^YELLOW^remember^22$$
//69-express-MONDAY-edge-54//
--42~KITCHEN~save~COLD~40--
==51%REPLY%even%AUGUST%28==
%%63&list&INSIDE&train&58%%
^^19!spain!CONGO!spain!01^^
::30@SMILED@from@PERIOD@90::
&&05%decimal%THREE%remember%80&&
..47^ROAD^dress^BERLIN^11..
bart-iMac2013:~ bart$

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Firstly, thanks to everyone who runs beta versions of Crypt::HSXKPasswd – every bug you find makes the software that little bit better!

However, now that the software is in CPAN, many of you may well want to move away from the stand-alone beta releases, and start getting the module directly from CPAN. Before you install the module from CPAN, you should remove the beta from your system. You can do that in two easy steps:

  1. Install pm-uninstall from CPAN: sudo cpan App::pmuninstall
  2. Use pm-uninstall to remove the beta version of Crypt::HSXKPasswd: sudo pm-uninstall Crypt::HSXKPasswd

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This post is part 35 of 37 in the series Taming the Terminal

The previous instalment we introduced the HTTP protocol. In this instalment we’ll look at three terminal commands which make use of the HTTP protocol.

We’ll start by browsing from the terminal, and then move on to a pair of very similar commands for making HTTP requests from the terminal. These two commands can do many things, but we’ll focus on two specific use-cases, downloading files, and viewing HTTP headers.

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This post is part 34 of 37 in the series Taming the Terminal

In the previous instalment we finished a five-part series on SSH. Before moving on, lets take a moment to step back and look at the big-picture. The five SSH instalments are all part of the now long-running series on networking. We have been working our way through the networking stack since instalment 23. We started at the bottom of the stack, and have worked our way up. We are not exploring protocols in the Application Layer.

In this instalment we’re moving on from SSH to HTTP, the protocol that powers the world wide web.

Before we look at some HTTP-related terminal commands, we need a basic understanding of how HTTP works, so that’s what this instalment is all about.

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This post is part 33 of 37 in the series Taming the Terminal

This is the final SSH instalment. So far we’ve learned how to securely execute terminal commands on remote computers, how to securely copy files across the network using SSH, how to add both security and convenience to both those operations with SSH key pairs, and how to tunnel just about anything through SSH. In this final instalment we’ll look two approaches for creating SSH bookmarks, SSH config files, and SSH GUIs.

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This post is part 32 of 37 in the series Taming the Terminal

This is the fourth SSH instalment. So far we’ve learned how to securely execute terminal commands on remote computers, how to securely copy files across the network using SSH, and how to add both security and convenience to both those operations with SSH key pairs.

As we saw in the previous instalment, SSH’s ability to provide a secure connection between two computers can be used in many different ways. In this instalment we’ll learn about three more ways to encapsulate other network traffic within an SSH connection, adding encryption to that traffic.

Running commands and copying files are the kinds of things most people do, so the three SSH instalments to date have been quite generally applicable. That is not the case for this instalment. The three SSH features we’ll be discussing are all very useful to those who need them, but only a minority will have a use for any one of these features. However, even if you don’t need these features today, I would argue that it’s good to know these features exist, because they could well solve a problem you’ll have in the future.

There will be illustrations of the uses for these technologies, but not commands you type into your terminal to play along at home. That makes this an unusual instalment, but I hope you will still find it worthwhile.

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This post is part 31 of 37 in the series Taming the Terminal

In Part 29 of n we learned how to use SSH to execute commands on a remote computer. In the previous instalment we learned how to add security and convenience to SSH connections using SSH key-pairs.

The most important thing SSH provides is an encrypted connection between two computers. As we’ve seen, that encrypted connection can be used to securely issue terminal commands to a remote computer, but that same secured channel can also be used to secure other network connections between computers. In this instalment we’ll look at three different ways of securely copying files between computers through an SSH connection, and in the next instalment we’ll look at tunnelling just about any network connection through an SSH connection.

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This post is part 30 of 37 in the series Taming the Terminal

In the previous instalment we saw how we can use SSH to execute a single command on a remote computer, or, to get a command shell on a remote computer. We also saw how SSH uses host keys to protect us from man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks.

In this instalment we’re going to look at how we can improve both SSH security and convenience with SSH keys.

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I spent of a bit of time tweaking my server backup script this week, and figured there was no reason not to share it with others. This is not the be-all-and-end-all of backup scripts, or the most flexible backup script in the world, it does what I need from a backup script, and nothing more or less! It might meet your needs, or, more likely, it might make a useful starting point for a script that meets your exact needs.

You’ll find the code and the documentation over on my GitHub account.

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