In instalment 30 of the Taming the Terminal series I showed how SSH keys can be used to more securely and conveniently connect to servers. The instructions in that instalment are for Linux-like OSes (including MacOS) where the standard OpenSSH tools are available.

Windows doesn’t ship with OpenSSH (or indeed any SSH implementation), so Windows users who want to SSH need to install some kind of additional software. With Windows 10 there is the obvious option of installing the Windows Subsystem for Linux, but people may prefer a GUI experience. The obvious choice for Windows users is the venerable free and open source PuTTY suite of tools.

The PuTTY SSH client itself is easy to use, and if you install the full suite of apps via the MSI installer (available on their download page) you’ll also get a GUI for generating SSH keys named PuTTYgen.

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This post is part 37 of 39 in the series Taming the Terminal

Since we covered SSH in parts 29 & 30, Apple have changed how their desktop OS deals with the passphrases protecting SSH identities (key pairs). This provides us a good opportunity to have a look at the SSH Agent in general, and, how things have changed on the Mac in particular.

The good news is that while things have changed on the Mac, with a small amount of effort, you can get back all the convenience and security you had before.

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