This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

Tagged with:

This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

Tagged with:

This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

Tagged with:

This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

Tagged with:

This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

Tagged with:

This morning the Busschots family became a little bit poorer, as someone we all loved, admired, and respected passed from this earth into the realm of our fond memories.

Read more

This post is part 92 of 92 in the series Programming by Stealth

This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

Tagged with:

This post is part 91 of 92 in the series Programming by Stealth

This instalment is hosted on GitHub — Read the Show Notes Here.

Tagged with:

While I wrote these MacOS Quick Actions to scratch my own proverbial itch, I think they could be of use to others, so I’m releasing them as open source.

The actions allow you to calculate the word count, line count, and character count of selected text, to convert a text selection to upper case, lower case, or title case, to do the same to the contents of the clipboard, and to convert the clipboard from rich text to plain text and to trim the contents of the clipboard.

You can download the actions and read the docs on GitHub.

As well as describing what each of the Quick Actions do, the GitHub docs also describe how to install the actions, how to use them, and how to assign keyboard shortcuts to them if desired.

If you’re curious to learn how these Quick Actions work, read on.

Read more

Tagged with:

In instalment 30 of the Taming the Terminal series I showed how SSH keys can be used to more securely and conveniently connect to servers. The instructions in that instalment are for Linux-like OSes (including MacOS) where the standard OpenSSH tools are available.

Windows doesn’t ship with OpenSSH (or indeed any SSH implementation), so Windows users who want to SSH need to install some kind of additional software. With Windows 10 there is the obvious option of installing the Windows Subsystem for Linux, but people may prefer a GUI experience. The obvious choice for Windows users is the venerable free and open source PuTTY suite of tools.

The PuTTY SSH client itself is easy to use, and if you install the full suite of apps via the MSI installer (available on their download page) you’ll also get a GUI for generating SSH keys named PuTTYgen.

Read more

Tagged with:

older posts »